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OUR ADOPTABLE PETS

Wednesday, January 16, 2008

Thank You For Fostering Me!

You Saved My Life!


I'm one of the lucky ones....I'm on my way to a FOSTER HOME!

WATCH FOR A FOSTER HOME PROGRAM
COMING SOON TO OUR COMMUNITY!

THE BIG PICTURE - ABOUT FOSTERING

Fostering is SO much harder than adopting. You give your time, your love, and the comfort of your daily routine away, all to see this adorable dog leave? Why? If fostering were easy, more people would do it. "I get so attached!" We hear it all the time. We understand how you feel. Fostering is more than getting attached to the one whose life you are saving. It's being able to see the "big picture," which has been explained by our founder, Michelle Losh, like this: "Every dog who is cared for by a foster home is where it is supposed to be at that moment. We are just caring for these dogs until they finally get home."

When I fostered for the first time, I told myself, "I can't do it, it's too hard." But the more I thought about the "Big Picture," the more I realized that if I didn't foster, the one I didn't take in might die in a shelter without ever knowing what it was like to really be home. Were my feelings about becoming attached more important to me at the time? Absolutely. But after I saw the Big Picture, I began to see that every dog I could foster was with me for the time it was supposed to be with me, and they weren't supposed to stay with me. They were supposed to be in their forever home. The problem is, the shelters don't have the space, time, or resources to care for a dog until he finds his forever home. This is what a foster home provides, and what is the most important part to remember -- you are saving a life. While you are saving a life, you get to enjoy the love and gratefulness of a dog who would otherwise be living outside in the weather, or being beaten and abused, or being dumped like so much garbage by an abusive owner, or in a shelter waiting to be adopted, and then eventually being put to sleep.
YOU, the FOSTER HOME, are part of the life saving process, you are these dogs' last hope for life. Getting them out of the shelter is the easy part. You have the task of helping this dog learn manners, learn it's okay to make a mistake, learn that food isn't to share with 10 others, and learn how to trust again. It's such a good feeling! I used to cry every time a dog would leave my home, but I feel so much better when I see the Big Picture.
Our kids learn to be kind to animals, how to care for them, and how to be sensitive to the fact that they cannot live without our help.


1 comment:

Anonymous said...

I think a lot of people have a hard time with the feelings for their first fosters. It seems like everyone I know ended up adopting their first foster. I have seen kids and adults alike cry when their first foster got adopted, including myself. I don't think it is something that you can really ever completely get over. I still find tears in my eyes today when I get a foster adopted.

It takes a strong person to be able to foster, and I commend anyone who does. It takes a lot of love and room in your heart

RESCUES CAN'T SAVE LIVES WITH PET LIMIT LAWS

Pet Limit Laws Limit Rescue Organizations and other Responsible Pet Owners, Not Irresponsible Pet Owners
An irresponsible pet owner will be irresponsible with one -- or 20 -- pets! Until a city can write an ordinance that forces people to CARE about their animals, a few irresponsible pet owners will continue to indirectly help in the killing of healthy, adoptable animals at kill shelters everywhere.
A rescue organization member is trained in how to handle more than 3 dogs, is responsible enough to say, "I can't handle any more dogs right now," pays to spay/neuter, vaccinate, and put pets on heartworm and flea prevention, and gives much needed additional time for the pet to find its forever home.

We have asked the City of Arnold to allow rescue organizations the opportunity to save more lives by going over the pet limit every now and then to save a life. Our many requests are falling on deaf ears.

If you believe the City of Arnold could -- and should -- tolerate rescue groups enough to make an exception to the dog limit every now and then to save a life, please contact Mary Holden at mholden@arnoldmo.org and Matt Unrein at munrein@arnoldmo.org, and contact your city council representatives and tell them there is such a thing as COOPERATION between government and citizens! We're doing it for the New JCAC Shelter Fund!